SHOCKER: Gonzalez Denied Tenure!!!

Actually this is completely anticlimactic. The Regents rarely take a differing view on tenure decisions from the tenure committee itself. So sorry Tara, you got it wrong… the decision is already out:

The Iowa Board of Regents has denied Guillermo Gonzales’, associate professor of physics and astronomy, appeal for tenure. After a private deliberation, the Board voted down the appeal which has already been denied by Iowa State University and ISU President Gregory Geoffroy.

No details at this point. But look for the Discovery Institute Spin Room to start kvetching at any moment, if they haven’t already. At least Casey Luskin will have something to whine about besides his inability to figure out internet image copyright stuff. Might I suggest that he begin by taking a cue from my post title and just pretend that Gonzalez was actually thrice denied tenure– once by the tenure board, once by the Preznident, and once by the Board of Regents– for maximum martyrhood?
It’s practically Biblical.

A Handy Graphic/Timeline of Gonzalez’s Publication Drop

Intelligent Design is a career-killer. There’s just no two ways about it. And not because of how peers treat the ID supporter; they throw their own productivity under the bus, to use Casey Luskin’s overworked cliche. We saw the same thing with Behe and Dembski. Behe has published ONE peer-reviewed paper in the last decade-ish. And Dembski… well, does anybody even know where he works these days?

Continue reading

A clarification about the pending Gonzalez lawsuit, for Bad Astronomy

Phil over at Bad Astronomy has it a bit backwards, but hey it’s not his fault. He didn’t have to sit through that nightmare of a press conference.

I still stick by my own conclusion too, that by trying to say that Gonzalez’s religious freedom has been curtailed, they are admitting ID is religion and not science, which they vehemently denied with the Dover case. I think if this comes to court, that’ll be a fun issue to grill them about.

From the press conference, the DI is clearly trying to distance religion from ID. The subject never really came up until a reporter asked about it. Even a handout in the DI information packet gives instructions on how to properly define ID, which includes notions like separating it from creationism and religious concepts like “higher power”. They’ve already had their day in court at Dover (and lost) because ID was (correctly) tied to religion. They don’t want to go back there. Another flub of a court case will cement Intelligent Design as a legal failure.
No, this time around they’ll likely try to claim a hostile work environment. They can’t risk having ID identified with religion and not science yet again. Which is unfortunate, because as Phil said, it would be really frakkin’ fun….

The Disco Institute has a press conference on Gonzalez’s behalf

Yesterday the Discovery Institute held a press conference at the capitol building in Des Moines, to announce Guillermo Gonzalez’s plans to sue Iowa State University over their decision to deny him tenure. Supposedly the lawsuit will be filed pending the rejection of an appeal to the Board of Regents, which is virtually guaranteed simply for the fact that the Regents typically uphold tenure decisions. Joining Casey Luskin, Rob Crowther, Gonzalez’s attorneys, and a few other DI folk was state Senator David Hartsuch (R-District 41).

Continue reading

BREAKING: Christian University Censors Science!!!!!

Ha ha, fooled you!
The Discovery Institute has just issued this on their blog, the inaccurately named Evolution News and Views:

According to CSC senior fellow and leading ID theorist William Dembski, what follows is:

“[A] big story, perhaps the biggest story yet of academic suppression relating to ID. Robert Marks is a world-class expert in the field of evolutionary computing, and yet the Baylor administration, without any consideration of the actual content of Marks’s work at the Evolutionary Informatics Lab, decided to shut it down simply because there were anonymous complaints linking the lab to intelligent design.”

Read on if you care at all about academic freedom and protecting the right of scientists to freedom of scientific inquiry.

So Dembski takes a step down in status, returning to the place that canned him once already. He comes crawling back as a postdoc, and is somehow surprised when the University doesn’t want to see him around anymore? Shocking. Who does that??? When you’re a professor and you want to do research, you do it in your lab. If you can’t do it in your lab, you go on sabbatical so you can bring it to your lab someday. Then you get grants to fund said work in your lab. If your institution won’t support said work, you find one that will hire you. But stepping back into a postdoc is like going back to trade school for something you’re already certified to do. And there but for the grace of God go I.
Is this really about academic freedom, or is it about the University not wanting to deal with some flunky they already pink-slipped? Because if it’s the former, the DI is basically admitting that even devoutly Christian schools, like the esteemed Baylor University, don’t find Intelligent Design stealth creationism to be very compelling. Methinks if the DI’s strategy is actually to win people over, throwing the egomaniacal Dembski under the bus on this one might be a better option.
I mean really. Can you say “I’m hell bent on using you for the affiliation” any more clearly?

Creationists up to no good in Chesterfield County, VA

It looks like somebody either never heard of Dover, or refused to learn from their lesson. It seems the local ID supporters of Chesterfield County aren’t happy:

So far, the official actions of the CCSB have been limited to issuing a rather vague and confusing statement. ID proponents had hoped to influence the selection of science textbooks, but they started their campaign too late, and the CCSB approved the selection of standard biology texts. But there is still much concern about the situation in Chesterfield. ID supporters, backed by a local conservative group called the Family Foundation, are energetic and well-organized, as evidenced by their ability to deliver a petition with more than 1,100 people who questioned the use of “evolution-only” science texts.

Energetic and well-organized supporters of pseudoscience… sounds like a one-way ticket to another budget-busting, unwinnable multimillion dollar lawsuit. Virginia, you can do better than these guys.
The Alliance for Science has the full story. If you are a Virginia resident and want to get involved, please contact them. Also, visit the link to learn much more about the story, and also about Shawn Smith’s blog that tracks the Intelligent Design Creationism movement in Chesterfield County. Let’s keep sound science in Virginia science classes and get the jump on things before the anti-science ID creationist movement can stir up trouble.

Creationists up to no good in Chesterfield County, VA

It looks like somebody either never heard of Dover, or refused to learn from their lesson. It seems the local ID supporters of Chesterfield County aren’t happy:

So far, the official actions of the CCSB have been limited to issuing a rather vague and confusing statement. ID proponents had hoped to influence the selection of science textbooks, but they started their campaign too late, and the CCSB approved the selection of standard biology texts. But there is still much concern about the situation in Chesterfield. ID supporters, backed by a local conservative group called the Family Foundation, are energetic and well-organized, as evidenced by their ability to deliver a petition with more than 1,100 people who questioned the use of “evolution-only” science texts.

Energetic and well-organized supporters of pseudoscience… sounds like a one-way ticket to another budget-busting, unwinnable multimillion dollar lawsuit. Virginia, you can do better than these guys.
The Alliance for Science has the full story. If you are a Virginia resident and want to get involved, please contact them. Also, visit the link to learn much more about the story, and also about Shawn Smith’s blog that tracks the Intelligent Design Creationism movement in Chesterfield County. Let’s keep sound science in Virginia science classes and get the jump on things before the anti-science ID creationist movement can stir up trouble.